Max Mogg - Berlin

The Max Mogg – Berlin approach to overcoats is similar to that of our shirts and suits. Here, we’ll go beyond aesthetics and explain the cut of our overcoats.

Overcoat

Construction

Our overcoats are fully-canvassed. This is non-negotiable. There is no reason to invest in anything less than the best when commissioning an overcoat.

Shoulder

The shoulder-line is possibly the most distinctive part of a tailor’s work. Our aesthetic is distinctly British. Much like our suits’, our overcoats’ shoulders are roped. However, they are cut slightly wider, so as to be comfortable when wearing knitwear and/or a jacket.

Armhole

The armholes of our overcoats are cut very high. Aside from its clear functional advantages, it also adds something to the aesthetic. The high armhole affords maximum comfort and freedom of movement while simultaneously stretching the silhouette to make the upper body look more slender. To further accentuate this slender look, we cut our sleeves rather slim, creating a true hourglass shape through the body.

Length

We love long overcoats and ours are cut unabashedly long. Other than the functional benefits of a longer overcoat, it also elongates the silhouette. Our ideal length covers the calf. That being said, we always apply our own formula to determine ideal length. The key element here is overall body type.

Back

A beautiful overcoat must have a beautiful back. We cut the back as slim as possible without restricting freedom of movement. This is one of a good tailor’s most important tasks.

Button Stance

To keep out inclement weather, our button stance is somewhat higher than on our jackets. However, this depends on the customer’s personal preference and if the wearer is fond of scarves.

Lapel

Our silhouette has been described as being more traditionally feminine than masculine. This is why our wide lapels play a key role. Wider lapels serve to build up the look of the chest and balance out the overall look.